1984
Adventure: Text
£9.95
English
ZX Spectrum 48K
None

66
Peter Shaw, David Nicholls
Chris Bourne

Peter Pan is the first adventure - in fact the first game of any kind - from book publishers Hodder and Stoughton. The package includes a large plastic video box containing the cassette, a copy of the original book and a four-page introductory leaflet which explains the aims of the game and some of the more useful commands. Out of the retail price, a contribution is made to the Great Ormond Street Children's Hospital as part of the 'Barrie Bequest' - a worthy cause indeed.

Peter Pan's format owes a lot to The Hobbit, with full screen graphics and independent characters. There are, however, several differences - many purely technical but one in particular that centres around the actual solving of the adventure. Whereas in The Hobbit average punter can do quite well without reading the book, in Peter Pan knowledge of the text is essential. So if like me you never quite got around to reading it (the sad indicator of a miss-spent youth) you'll find Tinkerbell dying with alarming regularity and a few other strange things happening besides!

On the technical side, one has to say that it drops below the ' Hobbit standard' on almost every count. The commands, like most other adventures, are single verb/ noun pairs (with the exception of the SAY command which allows you to speak), and the input routine is slow - as is the response to commands. But PP does manage to serve up some very good graphics.

Actually, despite all the forgoing, I think Peter Pan really is a reasonable adventure... it's just that it suffers from an overdose of bad programming. I wouldn't recommend it to everyone, but if you've read the book - or if you're one of those avid adventurers - you'll probably find it quite enjoyable.

Not Rated

Screenshot Text

A Hobbit-like sortie into Never Never Land - but make sure you read the book first!