Beyond Software
1984
Tactical Combat
£7.95
Multiple languages (see individual downloads)
ZX Spectrum 48K
None

45
Ian Hemmingway, Phil Morse, Frank Pelling, Owen Pugh, Monty Trent
Chris Bourne

The player eventually becomes the Psytron - something less than human and more than a computer - and is put in charge of the Betula 5 installation. Your job is to cope with the defensive demands when the attack comes. The overall aim is to process the information (and highly detailed it is) supplied in the 20-page booklet accompanying the program.

Ian: The graphics are excellent, with instant access to the ten views around your base, all of which detail the surrounding buildings and landscapes. And a near perfect use of colour goes even further towards making the overall display startlingly clear. Each year a program comes along that sets the standard by which the others must be judged. Psytron is 1984's yardstick.

Frank: The idea is simply splendid, and there's so much going on it's impossible to get bored. With its well-defined, clear and colourful graphics, and a manageable but challenging speed, the game is addictive from the very start, and gets more so as the player progresses.

Phil: There are six levels to the game, but it'll take a great deal of practice to get there - especially as the speed is very fast. However, there's not a lot of sound used, but this goes unnoticed alongside the superb graphics. Overall, it's one of the most interesting games to come on to the market.

Not Rated

Screenshot Text

The outer buildings of the Betula 5 installation. A total of 10 screens make up this circular space station.

The main screen report area, which tells you of attacks - from the enemy spaceships.

The airlock tunnel in - which sabateurs have to be chased by your droids.

This is the view from the pursuit droid as it rushes down the tunnel chasing a sabateur.