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T.J. Adcock
1985
Sport: Action
£1.99
English
ZX Spectrum 48K
None

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40
Chris Bourne

The cover picture for this game shows a very irate tennis player eating a tennis ball. In the background there is a picture of the referee with a tennis racquet neatly placed around his neck. With a picture like that and a name like Super Brat the game seems to feature a well known tennis star, one who did not make Wimbledon this year. In fact Super Brat features tennis, and no tennis player in particular.

You view the game from the commentator's box, and your player is the one in the foreground. After entering your name you will be asked to select a 3 or 5 set game. That done, it will be your turn to serve. Position your player by moving him left or right along the base line and then use the 'P' key to toss the ball up in the air. To hit the ball you simply press 'P' again but the direction of the serve depends on the delay between the first press and the second. For example, if you want the serve to go to the left then allow only a very short delay between presses, for the ball to go to the right you must allow a longer delay. The game will enforce the rules as laid down by the Lawn Tennis Association. Calls for net, foot fault and the like are announced on the scoreboard. There are also two line judges and a net judge; if they report a fault you will see them raise a little hand.

The object of the game is to become the number one seed. To do this you must battle your way through three tournaments: the British, the European and World finals. Only then can you be allowed to act like Super Brat and still be applauded for it.

CRITICISM

'Super Brat is probably the only 3D tennis game to emerge since Match Point. However, the two games are very different from one another. The players in Super Brat are not mere stick men, and have form and colour - but they do move rather jerkily and, unlike Match Point, you can only move along the baseline, Generally the game is much less complex than Match Point. Super Brat is both playable and mildly addictive. So it does stand up rather well against Match Point but don't forget that that game is getting a bit long in the tooth'

'Super Brat took a bit of getting used to. It took about five game before I became proficient at serving. You have no control over the power of your shot, only the direction, but that does help to keep game play simple. My only criticism is that the ball is too small. I needed a telescope to see it! Overall this is a pretty acceptable game'

'I found this game to be pretty easy to get into, as it manages to avoid the sort of complex key operations normally associated with ball games. Match Point automatically changes between forehand and backhand, often at the most inconvenient time. Super Brat, being a little more unsophisticated, manages to do without such complexities to the advantage of game play. The graphics are colourful but not very detailed. I loved the player's pink legs/socks. My only regret was that the bright colours tended to obscure the ball. As tennis games go it's very acceptable for the money, but perhaps not for the purist.'

COMMENTS
Control keys: 1 /2 left/right, P to serve
Joystick: none
Keyboard play: fine
Use of colour: good but a bit garish
Graphics: acceptable
Sound: nasty tune, otherwise cast spot effects
Skill levels: three
Lives: N/A
Screens: N/A
General Rating: Very good for the price.

65%
72%
70%
67%
65%
77%
72%

Screenshot Text

Number One court, setting up for the game in SUPER BRAT. But there aren't any strawberries - or cream for that matter. What's tennis coming to? If Henry the Eighth hadn't invented the game, where would the Scandanavian be today?