Tartan Software
Tom D. Frost
1986
Adventure: Text
£2.50
English
ZX Spectrum 48K
None

42
Ian Osborne
Chris Bourne

Any James Bond fans out there? (No, but there's quite a few people in here I'd like to shake and stir - Ed). This is a definite golden oldie, so let's take a quick trip back in time to when all Speccys had 'dead flesh' rubber keyboards and 48K memory was considered huge (and everyone ate Hovis bread and worked down 'pit, etc etc... -Ed).

Spy Trilogy has three separate missions - dreaming of qualifying, really qualifying and finally your first mission as a fully-fledged 007. Technically the game's showing its age a little. You can't RAMSave and it's a bit slow, but still thoroughly absorbing. It's well set out, the problems are logical, and it's very atmospheric -you really do get the feeling of being there.

The first mission, later revealed to be a dream sequence, features a series of riddles and a mind-bending mathematical puzzle that should you busy for quite a while. Although some of the puzzles rely on this dream state for their validity, their logic is always internally consistent and certainly won't destroy the atmosphere of the game. The second and third missions are of a more serious nature. In the second, you must find two components of a top secret instrument, and make good your escape. The third quest has you retrieving a code book from an enemy complex, and throwing it to your mate outside - and hopefully living to tell the tale!

On all three missions there is a time limit, though thankfully it is the amount of moves that is limited- no annoying 'real time' messages to interfere with the gameplay.

The first two missions are not exceptionally difficult, but part three is harder. The maps are always logical, and you are even advised as to where to draw your first location! (I wonder why this never caught on?)

Both beginners and more experienced adventurers should find something to their liking here, and as we're offering it cheaper via. the Treasure Chest, it's certainly worth a look.

CRITICISM

86%